Queen's University

sava saheli singh

sava saheli singh
sava saheli singh

Post-doctoral Fellow, Queen's University, Canada

sava is a postdoctoral fellow with the Surveillance Studies Centre, working on an OPC-funded knowledge translation project for the Big Data Surveillance project. she completed her PhD in 2017 from New York University's Educational Communication and Technology program. her dissertation, titled "Academic Twitter: Pushing the Boundaries of Traditional Scholarship", addresses how 21st century academics negotiate their professional identities as a complex form of emotional, intellectual, and academic labor and the ways in which this helps and hinders their academic and personal lives. her current research interests include educational surveillance and critically examining the effects of technology and techno-utopianism on society.

Twitter: @savasavasava

Jennifer Whitaker

Jennifer Whitaker
Jennifer Whitaker

MA Candidate, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Jennifer Whitaker entered the MA Sociology program in the fall of 2017 after completing her BA (Honours) the previous spring, also in the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University. Under the supervision of Dr. Norma Möllers, her MA thesis focusses on the collection of information for workplace wellness programs and details current health care law and non-discrimination policy in the United States. Jennifer is particularly interested in the technological, ethical and political intersections of surveillance studies and continues to explore these topics in her research.

Thomas Linder

Thomas Linder
Thomas Linder

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Thomas Linder is a doctoral candidate and a Big Data Surveillance research fellow at the Surveillance Studies Centre at Queen’s University. Keenly interested in political theory, he completed his BA and MA at the University of Zurich. His MA thesis under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Philipp Sarasin investigated the complexity of defining surveillance in the digital era. 

His doctoral research is on emerging surveillance technologies and their impact on domestic security practices. Beyond political theory and international relations, he works in Science and Technologies Studies with a particular focus on digital technologies and is a co-editor at ‘Transmissions: An SSS Companion Blog.’ 

In addition, he is a research fellow in the Big Data Surveillance SSHRC project where he works on Big Data-driven national security surveillance practices as well as on the development of intelligence-led and predictive policing programs in Canada.

Contact:

Twitter: @pan_optician

PGP: 16TAL@queensu.ca — Key ID: BDB7D17F; Fingerprint: E448 381E 5DA7 CD7E 9B9B 7B79 6AAB 8279 BDB7 D17F

Signal: Ask for number.

 

Özge Girgin

Özge Girgin
Özge Girgin

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University

Özge is a PhD student at Queen's University in the Department of Sociology. She received her BA in Communications from Bilkent University in Turkey, her MA in International Communications from the University of Leeds in the UK (as a British Chevening scholar) and completed her Master’s in Business Administration in Perugia, Italy. Following her studies, Özge spent ten years working in Turkey for multinational companies in trade, marketing and sales. It was during this time that she became interested in the area of surveillance studies. Her research explores the ways in which surveillance subjects make sense of various forms of surveillance through their smartphones, and the ways in which surveillance is facilitated through smartphones and mobile apps. Ozge worked as the organizer of the bi-weekly Surveillance Studies Center (SSC) Seminar Series from 2015 to 2018.

Sharryn J. Aiken

Sharry Aiken

Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University, Canada

Sharry Aiken is an assistant professor in the faculty of law at Queen's University. She is the editor in chief of Refuge, Canada's Periodical on Refugees and is a past president of the Canadian Council for Refugees. In 2006 she represented a coalition of public interest groups, including the Canadian Council for Refugees and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, in an intervention before the Supreme Court of Canada in the cases of Charkaoui, Harkat and Almrei. Relevant publications include “Manufacturing ‘Terrorists’: Refugees, National Security and Canadian Law” (2000); “Of Gods and Monsters: National Security and Canadian Refugee Policy”, (2001); “Risking Rights: An Assessment of Canadian Border Security Policies” (2007); “From Slavery to Expulsion: Racism, Canadian Immigration Law and the Unfulfilled Promise of Modern Constitutionalism” (2007); and “National Security and Canadian Immigration: Deconstructing the Discourse of Trade-Offs” (forthcoming 2008). In 2007 she was awarded a SSHRC standard research grant for her project, Refugee Diasporas,“Homeland” Conflicts and the Impact of the Post-9/11 Security Paradigm.

Midori Ogasawara

Midori Ogasawara
Midori Ogasawara

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Midori Ogasawara is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology. She received her BA in Law from Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan, and her MA from Queen’s University. Her MA thesis was entitled “ID TROUBLES: The National Identification Systems in Japan and the (mis) Construction of the Subject”, focusing on the transitions of ID techniques that classified the subjects of modern Japan. Midori’s current PhD project is “National Identification Systems and Techniques of Population Control: The development of surveillance–assisted political economy from colonial to neoliberal times in Japan”, supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship in 2014-2017, and the Mitacs Globalink Research Award in 2016. This project attempts to reveal the colonial origins and consequences of ID technologies, such as ID cards and biometrics, in northeastern China under the Japanese occupation from the 1920s.

Midori has a journalist background since having worked as a staff writer for Asahi Shimbun, Japan’s national newspaper, for 10 years, and was engaged in investigative reporting on the surveillance technologies, the sex slavery by Japan’s army during the Second World War, and the US bases in Okinawa. Midori was awarded the Fulbright Journalist Scholarship and John S. Knight Professional Journalism Fellowships at Stanford University in 2004-2005.

In May 2016, Midori interviewed the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden via a video channel, as the first Japanese researcher/journalist, and published the book, Snowden Talks About the Horror of the Surveillance Society: The Complete Record of An Exclusive Interview (2016, Japanese), and a number of articles (English and Japanese). She also translated David Lyon’s book Surveillance Studies into Japanese (published in 2011). 

Debra Mackinnon

Debra Mackinnon
Debra Mackinnon

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Debra Mackinnon entered the PhD sociology program in the fall of 2014. With an interest in criminology and sociology she received her BA (Honours) (2012) and MA (2014) from Simon Fraser University. Her MA thesis titled 'The Criminalization of Political Dissent: A critical discourse analysis of Occupy Vancouver and Bill C-309' focuses on pre-emptive formal social control tactics. Broadly, her research interests include: power and regulation, surveillance, securitization, urban policy mobility, political economy and critical legal theory. Her PhD project focuses on urban governance and managerialism by investigating the creation and legitimization of public-private surveillance networks and the adoption of big data practices in Canadian cities.

Michael Carter

Michael Carter
Michael Carter

PhD Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, Queen's University, Canada

With a BA (Honours) from Queen’s University, and an MA from the University of Toronto, Michael Carter is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s focused on ’smart cities’. He is supervised by Dr. David Murakami Wood. For his thesis he is researching the benefits, risks and governance models associated with the collection, analysis and sharing of personal mobility data in the context of public transit systems. He is interested in the futures of multi-modality, payment processing, trip planning and mobility as a service, and their convergences. Michael is currently conducting a case study on the Presto smart card system in the City of Toronto. This work is in conjunction with research on the Google spin-offs Coord and Sidewalk Labs, particularly their activity in the City of Toronto.

Norma Möllers

Norma Möllers

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Broadly speaking, Norma Möllers’ research interests are located at the intersections of science, technology, and politics: What kinds of values shape science & technology, and how are science & technology implicated in maintaining social order? She is specifically interested in the science and technology of security and surveillance. Further research interests include cybersecurity, digital work/labor (with particular focus on its gendered and global dimensions), and ‘neoliberal’ technoscience.

Currently, she is working on her first book manuscript. Based on an ethnography of the development of a ‘smart’ video surveillance system, it deals with the ways in which science and technology become enrolled in national strategies concerning security, and how this connects to broader shifts in technoscientific knowledge production. She has also started work on her second project which will address the question how governments deal with problems of national territory in cyberspace.

Norma Möllers joined Queen’s Sociology department in Fall 2015. Prior to coming to Queen’s, she worked as a researcher at Humboldt-University’s science studies department in Berlin, as a visiting researcher at UC Irvine, and worked as a researcher at Potsdam University, Germany, which is also where she obtained her PhD. She has studied at Passau University, Germany, and at Sapienza University, Rome.

David Skillicorn

David Skillicorn

Professor, School of Computing, Queen's University, Canada

David Skillicorn is a Professor in the School of Computing, where he heads the Smart Information Management Laboratory. His research interests are in knowledge discovery in adversarial settings, particularly counterterrorism and law enforcement; he has also worked extensively in parallel and distributed computing. He has authored more than a hundred papers, and several books including the recent "Knowledge Discovery for Counterterrorism and Law Enforcement" (Taylor and Francis). He is the coordinator for Research in Information Security in Kingston (RISK) and is also an adjunct Professor at the Royal Military College of Canada. His Ph.D. is from the University of Manitoba, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Sydney.

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