Laureen Snider

Sociology

Laureen Snider

Laureen Snider is a Professor of Sociology who specializes in the study of Corporate Crime, Surveillance and Regulation, Feminism and Sociologies of Punishment. Her most recent research, funded by the Social Science and Humanities Council of Canada, examines financial corporate crime, specifically the discontinuities and asymmetries that produce the under-use of surveillance and surveillance technologies in the governance of stock market fraud. The study documents and interrogates the “visibility covers” and “regions of shadow” negotiated by the powerful bankers, lawyers, accountants and stock brokers who dominate global financial markets.

Recent publications include (2010) “Tracking Environmental Crime Through CEPA: Canada’s Environment Cops or Industry’s Best Friend?”, with Suzanne Day and April Girard, in the Canadian Journal of Sociology; (2009) “Regulating Competition in Canada”, with Suzanne Day and Jordan Watters, in the Canadian Journal of Law & Society; and (2009) “Accommodating Power: The ‘Common Sense’ of Regulators” (2008), in Social & Legal Studies. Forthcoming publications assessing the most recent financial crisis, the technological arms race among Wall Street traders and its implications for regulatory agencies, the circular nature of crises, reform and regulatory back-tracking will be (or have just been) published in a number of journals, including Criminology & Public Policy and the Annual Review of Law & Social Sciences, and a number of edited books, titled European Developments in Corporate Criminal Liability (Sage, 2011); How They Got Away With It: White-Collar Crime and the Financial Meltdown (Columbia University Press, Forthcoming); Surveillance Games, (Routledge, 2011); and The Political Economy of Surveillance, (forthcoming 2011 or 2012). The latter 2 articles were both co-authored with Adam Molnar.

Publications

Books