SSC Associated Faculty

Elia Zureik

Professor Emeritus Elia Zureik
Professor Emeritus Elia Zureik

Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Life after Retiring in 2005

To keep one’s mind active while getting old, I am told, is a good recipe for fending off Alzheimer's and keeping visits to the doctor’s office at bay. What I did not pay enough attention to is the second prescription, namely to keep the body active as well. I compiled a list of publications to show what I have done since retiring in 2005.

2019 - Winter     Visiting researcher in the Arab Research Center, Doha Qatar
 
2014-2016    Professor and Head of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies

2012-2014; 2016    Guest Editor of Omran, a refereed social science journal that is published in Arabic by the Arab Research Center in Doha, Qatar (the theme of these issues is surveillance and privacy in the Arab World)

Refereed books:

Israel’s Colonial Project in Palestine: Brutal Pursuit, Routledge, London 2016

Coedited with David Lyon and Yasmeen Abu-Laban, Surveillance and Control in Israel/Palestine: Population, Territory and Power, Routledge, London, 2011.

Coedited with David Lyon, Emily Smith, Lynda Stalker, and Yolnade Chan Surveillance, The Globalization of Personal Data: International Comparisons, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2008

Coedited with Mark Salter, Global Surveillance and Policing: Borders, Security and Identity, Willan Publishing, London, 2005.

Journal publications

“Qatar’s Humanitarian Aid to Palestine,” Third World Quarterly, Fall 2017, Pp. 1-17.

“Strategies of Surveillance: The Israeli Gaze,” Jerusalem Quarterly, No. 66, 2016, Pp. 12-38.

Pending journal publications

"Methodological Issues in the Development of Social Science in the Arab World", to be published in Omran, an Arabic social science journal, January 2020.

"Donald Trump’s Punitive Politics and the Palestine Question: A Gaze into his Psychological Makeup and Business Ethics", to be published in The Journal of Holy LAND and Palestine Studies, Fall 2019.

Work in progress

"Settler Colonialism, Neoliberalism and Cyber Surveillance: The Case of Israel", in submission.
Netanyahu’s Only Democracy in the Middle East, in preparation.

Lisa Carver

Professor Lisa Carver
Professor Lisa Carver

Assistant Professor, School of Kinesiology & Health Studies, Queen's University, Canada

I have a PhD in Sociology and MA in Psychology.  My training and research are focused in the areas of Health (particularly the social justice, equity and health and illness) Aging and Gender.  I am also interested in the human-animal bond and well-being. At a personal level, and in my primary research, I believe that we need to take a stand when we see the need for change.  As a result, my research follows my interests and concerns, exploring dynamics of power, inequalities and social justice in understanding the impacts of illness, gender, education, ethnicity and socioeconomic level on various stages of the lifecourse.

Telephone: 
613-533-6000 x75434

Sharryn J. Aiken

Professor Sharryn J. Aiken
Professor Sharryn J. Aiken

Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University, Canada

Sharry Aiken is an assistant professor in the faculty of law at Queen's University. She is the editor in chief of Refuge, Canada's Periodical on Refugees and is a past president of the Canadian Council for Refugees. In 2006 she represented a coalition of public interest groups, including the Canadian Council for Refugees and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, in an intervention before the Supreme Court of Canada in the cases of Charkaoui, Harkat and Almrei. Relevant publications include “Manufacturing ‘Terrorists’: Refugees, National Security and Canadian Law” (2000); “Of Gods and Monsters: National Security and Canadian Refugee Policy”, (2001); “Risking Rights: An Assessment of Canadian Border Security Policies” (2007); “From Slavery to Expulsion: Racism, Canadian Immigration Law and the Unfulfilled Promise of Modern Constitutionalism” (2007); and “National Security and Canadian Immigration: Deconstructing the Discourse of Trade-Offs” (forthcoming 2008). In 2007 she was awarded a SSHRC standard research grant for her project, Refugee Diasporas,“Homeland” Conflicts and the Impact of the Post-9/11 Security Paradigm.

Midori Ogasawara

Dr. Midori Ogasawara
Dr. Midori Ogasawara

Banting Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Criminology, University of Ottawa, Canada

Midori Ogasawara completed her PhD in the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University in 2018. Her PhD dissertation “Bodies as Risky Resources: The Japanese Identification Systems as Surveillance, Population Control and Colonial Violence in Occupied Northeast China” explores a historical trajectory of today’s biometric technologies. Japan implemented fingerprinting, the forerunner of biometrics, when it occupied Northeast China in 1931-1945. Biometric ID systems became a powerful means of population control, which help the colonizers to classify the colonized to ‘desirable’ and ‘undesirable’. Ogasawara conducted archival and ethnographical research in China in 2016 and interviewed the colonial survivors and their family members who faced violent consequences of Japan’s intensive policing and surveillance.

Dr. Ogasawara is currently a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. Her research proposal for the 2018-2019 Banting competition was ranked second out of the 181 applications reviewed by SSHRC. The project investigates collaborative relationship between security intelligence agencies and big data corporations, and analyzes how the collaboration has been altering the legal boundary of mass surveillance in Canada, by legalizing previously illegal surveillance.

Obtaining her first degree in law, Dr. Ogasawara was a staff writer for Japan’s national newspaper The Asahi Shimbun, and was engaged in investigative journalism on surveillance technologies, Japan’s sex slavery during the Second World War, and the US bases in Okinawa. She was awarded the Fulbright Journalist Scholarship and John S. Knight Professional Journalism Fellowships at Stanford University in 2004-2005. During her doctoral studies, she also became a recipient of the highly competitive Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. In 2016, she was the first Japanese researcher/journalist to interview the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden via a video channel, and as a result published two books (2016, 2019) on the NSA’s secret activities in Japan and Japan’s involvement in global surveillance systems. She also translated Dr. David Lyon’s book Surveillance Studies into Japanese (published in 2011).

Sachil Singh

Dr. Sachil Singh
Dr. Sachil Singh

Post-doctoral Fellow, Surveillance Studies Centre, Assistant Professor, Queen's University, Canada

Dr. Singh is a post-doctoral fellow at the SSC. He is collating research findings from all three streams of the SSHRC-funded Big Data Surveillance (BDS) research project, led by Professor David Lyon, and will play a major role in organizing a final research conference, to take place in 2021. He is also an Assistant Professor (Adjunct) in the Department of Sociology at Queen's University, where he teaches the department's largest course, Introduction to Sociology (SOCY122). Finally, Dr. Singh is a Privacy and Ethics Officer with the Centre for Advanced Computing at Queen's University where he offers critical contributions to the development of the Ontario Health Data Platform (formerly PANTHR). This is a multi-million dollar project that the Province has invested in as one of the key responses to COVID-19. 

Dr. Singh's main areas of study are medical sociology, critical race studies and surveillance. More specifically, his research interests are in algorithmic inequality, social sorting, health and surveillance, and race and ethnicity. The common thread in his work is attention to the racial outcomes of digital sorting technologies. His most recent article (co-authored with Val Steeves) in Social Science and Medicine deals with the contested meanings of race/ethnicity in medical literature. He has also published in leading journals such as Security Dialogue, contributed to Transparent Lives: Surveillance in Canada, and has co-edited a Special Issue in Surveillance & Society. He recently wrote an article in The Conversation which highlights concerns with racial surveillance as a way to understand the reach of the coronavirus pandemic.
 

Telephone: 
613-533-6000 ext. 74876

Norma Möllers

Professor Norma Möllers
Professor Norma Möllers

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Broadly speaking, Norma Möllers’ research interests are located at the intersections of science, technology, and politics: What kinds of values shape science & technology, and how are science & technology implicated in maintaining social order? She is specifically interested in the science and technology of security and surveillance. Further research interests include cybersecurity, digital work/labor (with particular focus on its gendered and global dimensions), and ‘neoliberal’ technoscience.

Currently, she is working on her first book manuscript. Based on an ethnography of the development of a ‘smart’ video surveillance system, it deals with the ways in which science and technology become enrolled in national strategies concerning security, and how this connects to broader shifts in technoscientific knowledge production. She has also started work on her second project which will address the question how governments deal with problems of national territory in cyberspace.

Norma Möllers joined Queen’s Sociology department in Fall 2015. Prior to coming to Queen’s, she worked as a researcher at Humboldt-University’s science studies department in Berlin, as a visiting researcher at UC Irvine, and worked as a researcher at Potsdam University, Germany, which is also where she obtained her PhD. She has studied at Passau University, Germany, and at Sapienza University, Rome.

Laureen Snider

Proferssor Emerita Laureen Snider
Professor Emerita Laureen Snider

Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Laureen Snider is a Professor of Sociology who specializes in the study of Corporate Crime, Surveillance and Regulation, Feminism and Sociologies of Punishment. Her most recent research, funded by the Social Science and Humanities Council of Canada, examines financial corporate crime, specifically the discontinuities and asymmetries that produce the under-use of surveillance and surveillance technologies in the governance of stock market fraud. The study documents and interrogates the “visibility covers” and “regions of shadow” negotiated by the powerful bankers, lawyers, accountants and stock brokers who dominate global financial markets.

Recent publications include (2010) “Tracking Environmental Crime Through CEPA: Canada’s Environment Cops or Industry’s Best Friend?”, with Suzanne Day and April Girard, in the Canadian Journal of Sociology; (2009) “Regulating Competition in Canada”, with Suzanne Day and Jordan Watters, in the Canadian Journal of Law & Society; and (2009) “Accommodating Power: The ‘Common Sense’ of Regulators” (2008), in Social & Legal Studies. Forthcoming publications assessing the most recent financial crisis, the technological arms race among Wall Street traders and its implications for regulatory agencies, the circular nature of crises, reform and regulatory back-tracking will be (or have just been) published in a number of journals, including Criminology & Public Policy and the Annual Review of Law & Social Sciences, and a number of edited books, titled European Developments in Corporate Criminal Liability (Sage, 2011); How They Got Away With It: White-Collar Crime and the Financial Meltdown (Columbia University Press, Forthcoming); Surveillance Games, (Routledge, 2011); and The Political Economy of Surveillance, (forthcoming 2011 or 2012). The latter 2 articles were both co-authored with Adam Molnar.

David Skillicorn

Professor David Skillicorn
Professor David Skillicorn

Professor, School of Computing, Queen's University, Canada

David Skillicorn is a Professor in the School of Computing, where he heads the Smart Information Management Laboratory. His research interests are in knowledge discovery in adversarial settings, particularly counterterrorism and law enforcement; he has also worked extensively in parallel and distributed computing. He has authored more than a hundred papers, and several books including the recent "Knowledge Discovery for Counterterrorism and Law Enforcement" (Taylor and Francis). He is the coordinator for Research in Information Security in Kingston (RISK) and is also an adjunct Professor at the Royal Military College of Canada. His Ph.D. is from the University of Manitoba, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Sydney.

Vincent Mosco

Professor Emeritus Vincent Mosco
Professor Emeritus Vencent Mosco

Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University, Canada

Dr. Vincent Mosco is Professor Emeritus, Queen's University, Canada. He is formerly Canada Research Chair in Communication and Society and Professor of Sociology. Dr. Mosco graduated from Georgetown University (Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) in 1970 and received the Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University in 1975.

He is the author of numerous books in communication, technology, and society. His most recent books include The Political Economy of Communication, second edition (Sage, 2009), The Laboring of Communication: Will Knowledge Workers of the World Unite (co-authored with Catherine McKercher, Lexington Books, 2008), Knowledge Workers in the Information Society (co-edited with Catherine McKercher, Lexington Books, 2007), and The Digital Sublime: Myth, Power, and Cyberspace (MIT Press, 2004). The Digital Sublime won the 2005 Olson Award for outstanding book in the field of rhetoric and cultural studies.

Professor Mosco is a member of the editorial boards of academic journals in the North America, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. He has held research positions in the U.S. government with the White House Office of Telecommunication Policy, the National Research Council and the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and in Canada with the Federal Department of Communication. Professor Mosco is a founding member of the Union for Democratic Communication and has also been a longtime research associate of the Harvard University Program on Information Resources Policy. In addition, he has served as a consultant to trade unions and worker organizations in Canada and the United States. In 2004 Professor Mosco received the Dallas W. Smythe Award for outstanding achievement in communication research and in 2000 he was awarded one of three teacher of the year awards given by the Carleton University Student Association.

Professor Mosco is currently working on a project funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council that addresses knowledge and communication workers in a global information society. Specifically, it examines how workers around the world are responding to the challenges of technological change, transnational business, and the neo-liberal state. The results are reported in a special expanded issue of the Canadian Journal of Communication which he edited with Professor Catherine McKercher (October, 2006), as well as in Knowledge Workers in the Information Society and in The Laboring of Communication. Having completed a new edition of The Political Economy of Communication, Professor Mosco has begun a project that examines the relationship between the political economy tradition and that of science, technology and society.

Clarke Mackey

Professor Clarke Mackey
Professor Clarke Mackey

Professor, Film and Media, Queen's University, Canada

Pages