security

Election bill does little more than reinforce the status quo

By May 7, 2018, Opinion, iPolitics

Buried in the Liberals’ massive overhaul of Canadian elections law, revealed last week, were some provisions about privacy protection. Political parties are now mandated to have privacy policies, to display them on their websites and to lodge them with Elections Canada. Read...

Özge Girgin

Özge Girgin
Özge Girgin

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University

Özge is a PhD student at Queen's University in the Department of Sociology. She received her BA in Communications from Bilkent University in Turkey, her MA in International Communications from the University of Leeds in the UK (as a British Chevening scholar) and completed her Master’s in Business Administration in Perugia, Italy. Following her studies, Özge spent ten years working in Turkey for multinational companies in trade, marketing and sales. It was during this time that she became interested in the area of surveillance studies. Her research explores the ways in which surveillance subjects make sense of various forms of surveillance through their smartphones, and the ways in which surveillance is facilitated through smartphones and mobile apps. Ozge worked as the organizer of the bi-weekly Surveillance Studies Center (SSC) Seminar Series from 2015 to 2018.

Torin Monahan

Torin Monahan

Professor, Department of Communications, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

Torin Monahan is a Professor of Communication at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on institutional transformations with new technologies, with a particular emphasis on surveillance and security programs. He has published over forty articles or book chapters and five books, including Surveillance in the Time of Insecurity, which won the Surveillance Studies Book Prize of the Surveillance Studies Network in 2011. Areas of expertise include ethnography, science and technology studies, surveillance studies, critical criminology, urban studies, and contemporary social and cultural theory. Monahan is a director of the international Surveillance Studies Network and an associate editor of the leading academic journal on surveillance, Surveillance & Society.

Kirstie Ball

Professor Kirstie Ball
Professor Kirstie Ball

Professor, School of Management, University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Kirstie Ball is Professor of Management at the University of St Andrews. Her research focuses on surveillance, security and privacy, particularly as these issues affect organizations. Her current empirical work focuses on the impact of national security on the private sector, particularly on front line workers; the public understanding of security, surveillance and privacy; surveillance and democracy; and privacy and the quantified self. Her theoretical interest concerns subjectivity and surveillance. Kirstie has been collaborating with Queen’s University since 2001. She was featured as a research collaborator in ‘The Globalization of Personal Data’ and as  Co-Investigator in ‘The New Transparency’. Kirstie has held grants from many of the major European social science funders, including the European Union Framework Programme, EPSRC, ESRC and The Leverhulme Trust.  Her published work almost exclusively appears in journals such as New Technology, Work and Employment, Labour History, Tourism Management, Work, Employment and Society and Organization. She has recently published the monograph ‘The Private Security State? Surveillance, Consumer Data and the War on Terror’ with Copenhagen Business School Press.  She has also edited ‘The Routledge Handbook of Surveillance Studies’, with Kevin Haggerty and David Lyon, and ‘The Surveillance-Industrial Complex’ with Laureen Snider. Kirstie was a founding editor of Surveillance and Society and a founding director of Surveillance Studies Network.

As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Kirstie Ball is co-leading (with Colin Bennett) research Stream Two: Marketing. This stream will examine how massive data accumulation, analytical techniques and applications associated with big data are reconstructing practices of consumer marketing and political campaigning.

 

Telephone: 
+44 (0)1334 46 4840

David Murakami Wood

Professor David Murakami Wood
Professor David Murakami Wood

Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Surveillance Studies, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Educated at Oxford and Newcastle in the UK, David Murakami Wood is currently Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Surveillance Studies at Queen’s University in Ontario. He is a widely published specialist in the sociology and geography of surveillance and security in cities from a global comparative perspective, with a particular focus on Japan, Brazil, Canada and the UK, and is also very interested in science fiction and the future of surveillance. His current research project, Ubicity, funded by by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), considers the place of surveillance and security in the development of smart cities in Canada, the UK and the USA. In 2013-14, he was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  (JSPS) Invitation Fellow at Kwansei Gakuin University and Visiting Professor at Meiji University, in Japan. He is also an organizer in the field of surveillance studies as Co-editor-in-Chief of the international, open-access, peer-reviewed journal, Surveillance & Society, as well as a consultant and media commentator on surveillance issues. As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, also funded by SSHRC, David Murakami Wood was co-leader (with David Lyon) of research Stream One: Security, and is the co-editor of the first publication from the BDS project, Security Intelligence and Surveillance in the Big Data Age, coming in 2019 from UBC press. He has now moved to co-lead Stream Three, on Governance, with Val Steeves (Ottawa).

Telephone: 
(613) 533-6000 ext. 74490