Professor

Priscilla M. Regan

Dr. Priscilla Regan
Dr. Priscilla Regan

Professor, Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University, USA

Dr. Regan is a Professor in the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University. Prior to joining that faculty in 1989, she was a Senior Analyst in the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (1984-1989) and an Assistant Professor of Politics and Government at the University of Puget Sound (1979-1984). From 2005 to 2007, she served as a Program Officer for the Science, Technology and Society Program at the National Science Foundation. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Regan’s primary research interests have focused on both the analysis of the social, policy, and legal implications of organizational use of new information and communications technologies, and also on the emergence and implementation of electronic government initiatives by federal agencies. She is currently a co-investigator on a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s eQuality grant exploring big data, discrimination, and youth.


Dr. Regan has published over fifty articles or book chapters, as well as Legislating Privacy: Technology, Social Values, and Public Policy (University of North Carolina Press, 1995) and two co-edited books. As a recognized researcher in this area, Dr. Regan has testified before Congress and participated in meetings held by the Department of Commerce, Federal Trade Commission, Social Security Administration, and Census Bureau. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation and the US State Department. She was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, Committee on Authentication Technologies and their Privacy Implications. Dr. Regan received her PhD in Government from Cornell University and her BA from Mount Holyoke College.

Email: pregan@gmu.edu 



Telephone: 
703-993-1419

Mark Andrejevic

Professor Mark Andrejevic
Professor Mark Andrejevic

Professor, Communications & Media Studies, Monash University, Australia

Mark Andrejevic is Professor of Media and Communication at Monash University, Australia. He writes about surveillance, popular culture and digital media and is the author of, Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003), iSpy: Surveillance and Power in the Interactive Era (University Press of Kansas, 2007), Infoglut: How Too Much Information is Changing the Way We Think and Know (Routledge, 2013) and Automated Media (Routledge, 2019). He is a member of the NSF-funded Council for Big Data, Ethics, and Society and heads the Culture, Media, and Economy Focus Program at Monash University.

William Webster

Professor William Webster
Professor William Webster

Professor, Public Policy and Management, University of Stirling, United Kingdom

Professor C. William R. Webster is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Stirling. He is a Director of CRISP, a research centre dedicated to understanding the social impacts and consequences of technologically mediated surveillance. Prof Webster is the 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor, based at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington.  Professor Webster has research expertise in the policy processes, regulation and governance of CCTV, surveillance in everyday life, privacy and surveillance ethics, as well as public policy relating to data protection and e-government. He is chair of the Scottish Privacy Forum and the LiSS COST Action, and is involved in a number of research projects, including IRISS, ASSERT and SmartGov.

T: @CrispSurv

Telephone: 
+44 (0)1786 467359

Valerie Steeves

Professor Valerie Steeves
Professor Valerie Steeves

Professor, Department of Criminology, University of Ottawa, Canada

Valerie Steeves, B.A., J.D., Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa.  Her main area of research is in human rights and technology issues. Professor Steeves has written and spoken extensively on online issues, and has worked with a number of federal departments, including Industry Canada, Health Canada, Heritage Canada, the Department of Justice and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, on online policy.  She is also a frequent intervener before parliamentary committees, and has worked with a number of policy groups, including the International Council on Human Rights Policy (Geneva, Switzerland), the House of Lords Constitution Committee on The Impact of Surveillance and Data Collection upon the Privacy of Citizens and their Relationship with the State (United Kingdom), and the Children’s Online Privacy Working Group of the Canadian Privacy and Information Commissioners and Youth Advocates. Her current research focuses on children’s use of networked technologies, and the use of big data for predictive policing. She is the co-principal investigator (with Jane Bailey) of The eQuality Project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, which is examining young people’s experiences of privacy and equality in networked spaces.  She is also the lead researcher on the Young Canadian in a Wired World project (YCWW), which has been tracking young people’s use of new media since 1999. 

As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Valerie Steeves is co-leading (with Stéphane Leman-Langlois) research Stream Three: Governance. This stream will examine the use of big data for policing and other forms of social control.

Telephone: 
(613)562-5800 (ext 1793)

Stéphane Leman-Langlois

Professor Stéphane Leman-Langlois
Professor Stéphane Leman-Langlois

Professor, School of Social Work, Laval University, Canada

Stéphane Leman-Langlois is professor of criminology at Laval University, Québec. He holds the Canada Research Chair on Surveillance and the Social Construction of Risk. He is director of the Terrorism and Counterterrorism Research Group and of the Centre on International Security at Laval University. He is also co-director of the Observatoire sur la radicalisation et l’extrémisme violent (OSR).

As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Stéphane Leman-Langlois is co-leading (with Valerie Steeves) research Stream Three: Governance. This stream will examine the use of big data for policing and other forms of social control.

Telephone: 
(418) 656-2131, poste 2636

Colin J. Bennett

Professor Colin J. Bennett
Professor Colin J. Bennett

Professor, Political Science, University of Victoria, Canada

Colin Bennett received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from the University of Wales, and his Ph.D from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1986 he has taught in the Department of Political Science at the University of Victoria, where he is now Professor. He has enjoyed Visiting Professorships at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, the Center for the Study of Law and Society at University of California, Berkeley, the School of Law, University of New South Wales and at the the Law, Science, Technology and Society Centre at the Vrije Universiteit in Brussels. His research has focused on the comparative analysis of surveillance technologies and privacy protection policies at the domestic and international levels. In addition to numerous scholarly and newspaper articles, he has published six books, including The Governance of Privacy (MIT Press, 2006) and The Privacy Advocates: Resisting the Spread of Surveillance (MIT Press, 2008), and policy reports on privacy protection for Canadian and international agencies. He is co-investigator of a large Major Collaborative Research Initiative grant entitled “The New Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting” which has culminated in the report: Transparent Lives: Surveillance in Canada. He is also currently researching the capture and use of personal data by political parties in Western democracies.

As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Colin Bennett is co-leading (with Kirstie Ball) research Stream Two: Marketing. This stream will examine how massive data accumulation, analytical techniques and applications associated with big data are reconstructing practices of consumer marketing and political campaigning.

Telephone: 
250-721-7495
Email: 

Kirstie Ball

Professor Kirstie Ball
Professor Kirstie Ball

Professor, School of Management, University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Kirstie Ball is Professor of Management at the University of St Andrews. Her research focuses on surveillance, security and privacy, particularly as these issues affect organizations. Her current empirical work focuses on the impact of national security on the private sector, particularly on front line workers; the public understanding of security, surveillance and privacy; surveillance and democracy; and privacy and the quantified self. Her theoretical interest concerns subjectivity and surveillance. Kirstie has been collaborating with Queen’s University since 2001. She was featured as a research collaborator in ‘The Globalization of Personal Data’ and as  Co-Investigator in ‘The New Transparency’. Kirstie has held grants from many of the major European social science funders, including the European Union Framework Programme, EPSRC, ESRC and The Leverhulme Trust.  Her published work almost exclusively appears in journals such as New Technology, Work and Employment, Labour History, Tourism Management, Work, Employment and Society and Organization. She has recently published the monograph ‘The Private Security State? Surveillance, Consumer Data and the War on Terror’ with Copenhagen Business School Press.  She has also edited ‘The Routledge Handbook of Surveillance Studies’, with Kevin Haggerty and David Lyon, and ‘The Surveillance-Industrial Complex’ with Laureen Snider. Kirstie was a founding editor of Surveillance and Society and a founding director of Surveillance Studies Network.

As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Kirstie Ball is co-leading (with Colin Bennett) research Stream Two: Marketing. This stream will examine how massive data accumulation, analytical techniques and applications associated with big data are reconstructing practices of consumer marketing and political campaigning.

 

Telephone: 
+44 (0)1334 46 4840

David Skillicorn

Professor David Skillicorn
Professor David Skillicorn

Professor, School of Computing, Queen's University, Canada

David Skillicorn is a Professor in the School of Computing, where he heads the Smart Information Management Laboratory. His research interests are in knowledge discovery in adversarial settings, particularly counterterrorism and law enforcement; he has also worked extensively in parallel and distributed computing. He has authored more than a hundred papers, and several books including the recent "Knowledge Discovery for Counterterrorism and Law Enforcement" (Taylor and Francis). He is the coordinator for Research in Information Security in Kingston (RISK) and is also an adjunct Professor at the Royal Military College of Canada. His Ph.D. is from the University of Manitoba, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Sydney.

Clarke Mackey

Professor Clarke Mackey
Professor Clarke Mackey

Professor, Film and Media, Queen's University, Canada

Arthur Cockfield

Professor Arthur Cockfield
Professor Arthur Cockfield

Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada

Arthur Cockfield, HBA (University of Western Ontario), LL.B (Queen’s University), JSM and JSD (Stanford University), is an Associate Professor at Queen’s University Faculty of Law where he was appointed as a Queen’s National Scholar. Prior to joining Queen’s, he worked as a lawyer in Toronto and as a law professor in San Diego. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Texas and is a senior research fellow at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. Professor Cockfield has authored, co-authored or edited nine books and over forty academic articles and book chapters that focus on tax law as well as law and technology theory and privacy law. He is the recipient of a number of fellowships and external research grants for this research, including four grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, an American Tax Policy Institute grant, the Charles D. Gonthier research fellowship for privacy law research, and two publication grants from the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His writings have been translated into over twenty languages (mainly through his work as an author and editor for UNESCO) and have been published in North America, Asia, Europe and Australia.