privacy

Is Sidewalk Labs doing enough to protect privacy? No

By David Murakami Wood and Bianca Wylie , Aug. 28, 2018, Opinion, Toronto Star. Before we answer the question of whether Sidewalk Labs is doing enough to protect privacy, we have to ask what Sidewalk Labs is up to in Toronto in the first place. Read more.

Are Data Driven Elections Ethical? – Some Lessons from the UK

A data-driven election can be ethical

In the run-up to the 2019 federal election, there needs to be far more transparency about how personal data is captured, processed, mined,...

Funding awarded for 'Educational Media: Privacy in the Age of Big Data'

Congratulations to David Lyon, David Murakami Wood and sava saheli singh at the SSC on being awarded $70,000 from the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) under its Contributions Program for the project titled 'Educational Media: Privacy in the Age of Big Data'. For more information see the OPC funding...

Sidewalk Labs’ Toronto waterfront tech hub must respect privacy, democracy

By Andrew Clement, Opinion, The Toronto Star , January 12, 2018

Sidewalk Toronto can potentially set an exemplary standard for digital governance with its experimental Quayside neighbourhood. But the project should proceed no further than its planning period if it cannot achieve basic principles of organizational responsiveness, transparency and accountability. Read More...

Kirstie Ball

Professor Kirstie Ball
Professor Kirstie Ball

Professor, School of Management, University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Kirstie Ball is Professor of Management at the University of St Andrews. Her research focuses on surveillance, security and privacy, particularly as these issues affect organizations. Her current empirical work focuses on the impact of national security on the private sector, particularly on front line workers; the public understanding of security, surveillance and privacy; surveillance and democracy; and privacy and the quantified self. Her theoretical interest concerns subjectivity and surveillance. Kirstie has been collaborating with Queen’s University since 2001. She was featured as a research collaborator in ‘The Globalization of Personal Data’ and as  Co-Investigator in ‘The New Transparency’. Kirstie has held grants from many of the major European social science funders, including the European Union Framework Programme, EPSRC, ESRC and The Leverhulme Trust.  Her published work almost exclusively appears in journals such as New Technology, Work and Employment, Labour History, Tourism Management, Work, Employment and Society and Organization. She has recently published the monograph ‘The Private Security State? Surveillance, Consumer Data and the War on Terror’ with Copenhagen Business School Press.  She has also edited ‘The Routledge Handbook of Surveillance Studies’, with Kevin Haggerty and David Lyon, and ‘The Surveillance-Industrial Complex’ with Laureen Snider. Kirstie was a founding editor of Surveillance and Society and a founding director of Surveillance Studies Network.

As a co-investigator of the Big Data Surveillance project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Kirstie Ball is co-leading (with Colin Bennett) research Stream Two: Marketing. This stream will examine how massive data accumulation, analytical techniques and applications associated with big data are reconstructing practices of consumer marketing and political campaigning.

 

Telephone: 
+44 (0)1334 46 4840

Arthur Cockfield

Arthur Cockfield

Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada

Arthur Cockfield, HBA (University of Western Ontario), LL.B (Queen’s University), JSM and JSD (Stanford University), is an Associate Professor at Queen’s University Faculty of Law where he was appointed as a Queen’s National Scholar. Prior to joining Queen’s, he worked as a lawyer in Toronto and as a law professor in San Diego. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Texas and is a senior research fellow at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. Professor Cockfield has authored, co-authored or edited nine books and over forty academic articles and book chapters that focus on tax law as well as law and technology theory and privacy law. He is the recipient of a number of fellowships and external research grants for this research, including four grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, an American Tax Policy Institute grant, the Charles D. Gonthier research fellowship for privacy law research, and two publication grants from the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His writings have been translated into over twenty languages (mainly through his work as an author and editor for UNESCO) and have been published in North America, Asia, Europe and Australia.

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