Law

Lisa Austin

Professor Lisa Austin
Professor Lisa Austin

Professor, Chair in Law and Technology, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Canada

Professor Austin's research and teaching interests include privacy law, property law, and legal theory. She is published in such journals as Legal TheoryLaw and PhilosophyTheoretical Inquiries in LawCanadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence, and Canadian Journal of Law and SocietyShe is co-editor (with Dennis Klimchuk) of Private Law and the Rule of Law (Oxford University Press, 2015), in which distinguished Canadian and international scholars take on the general understanding that the rule of law is essentially only a doctrine of public law and consider whether it speaks to the nature of law more generally and thus also engages private law.

Professor Austin's privacy work has been cited numerous times by Canadian courts, including the Supreme Court of Canada. She is also active in a number of public policy debates in Canada. Most recently, she collaborated on a report for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada entitled Seeing Through the Cloud: National Jurisdiction and Location of Data, Servers, and Networks Still Matter in a Digitally Interconnected World. Previous policy work includes consulting for the Canadian Judicial Council on their Model Policy for Access to Court Records in Canada

Professor Austin is currently a member of the International Advisory Panel for the American Law Institute's project, Restatement of the Law (Fourth), Property

Telephone: 
416-946-7447

Lisa Kerr

Lisa Kerr

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada

Lisa Kerr is an Assistant Professor at Queen’s Law where she teaches courses on criminal law, sentencing and prison law.

Professor Kerr earned her JD at the University of British Columbia. She clerked with the BC Court of Appeal and was an associate at Fasken Martineau. She also served as staff lawyer at Prisoners’ Legal Services, Canada’s only dedicated legal aid office for prisoners.

Lisa obtained an LLM and a JSD at New York University, where she was named a Trudeau Scholar.  Her research focuses on punishment theory, the comparative study of criminal law and prisoner rights, and the relationship between sentencing and prison conditions. Professor Kerr has published a number of papers and opinion pieces in law journals and newspapers on these topics.

Professor Kerr is preoccupied with the concept of litigation as an instrument of social change, and she engages extensively in pro bono litigation work. For several years, she has worked with Pivot Legal Society on a campaign to decriminalize sex work.  She has worked on multiple cases with the B.C. Civil Liberties Association and with the John Howard Society of Canada in efforts to abolish solitary confinement in Canadian prisons. 

 

Arthur Cockfield

Arthur Cockfield

Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada

Arthur Cockfield, HBA (University of Western Ontario), LL.B (Queen’s University), JSM and JSD (Stanford University), is an Associate Professor at Queen’s University Faculty of Law where he was appointed as a Queen’s National Scholar. Prior to joining Queen’s, he worked as a lawyer in Toronto and as a law professor in San Diego. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Texas and is a senior research fellow at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. Professor Cockfield has authored, co-authored or edited nine books and over forty academic articles and book chapters that focus on tax law as well as law and technology theory and privacy law. He is the recipient of a number of fellowships and external research grants for this research, including four grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, an American Tax Policy Institute grant, the Charles D. Gonthier research fellowship for privacy law research, and two publication grants from the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His writings have been translated into over twenty languages (mainly through his work as an author and editor for UNESCO) and have been published in North America, Asia, Europe and Australia.

SSC Seminar Series: Malcolm Thorburn, Faculty of Law

Malcolm Thorburn, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen's University

Identification, Surveillance and Profiling: on the use and abuse of citizen data

Mac-Corry Hall, Room D411 (Sociology Lounge)

12:30 - 2:00 pm

This seminar addresses some concerns that have arisen recently about national identification schemes (such as the now-abandoned UK scheme). It distinguishes between (1) identification, (2) surveillance (understood very narrowly), and (3) profiling. Although...

SSC Seminar Series: Christine Bruckert and Tuulia Law

“The Costs of Surveilling Sexual Morality: Sex Work and the State”

** Please note time change to 12:00**

D216 Mac-Corry Hall
Queen's University

Christine Bruckert
Professor
Department of Criminology
University of Ottawa

Tuulia Law
MA Candidate
Institute of Women’s Studies
University of Ottawa


Both in its intent and its effect, the surveillance of sex workers does not promote their...

SSC Seminar Series: Sharry Aiken

“Surveillance and ‘Social Sorting’ at the Canadian Border”

Wednesday, February 2nd
12:30pm to 1:30pm
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Room D411
** Please note the day change to Wednesday**

Sharry Aiken
Associate Professor
Faculty of Law
Queen’s University

While Canada has deployed interdiction measures aimed to deter "spontaneous arrivals" at the Canadian border for decades, the government's recent response to the arrival...

Crime, Immigration and Surveillance Workshop @ Queen’s Nov 7 & 8, 2013

This workshop brings together experts on criminal law and theory, migration law and surveillance studies from a variety of traditions and jurisdictions. This workshop is open to faculty and students of Queen’s University. However, space is limited and advance registration is required.

If you wish to attend, please register with Megan Hamilton by Friday Nov. 1....