Assistant Professor

Congratulations to Midori Ogasawara!

Dr. Ogasawara has been appointed as a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Victoria , starting January 2021. Please also see her recent publications: Ogasawara, Midori. 2019. “The Daily Us (vs. Them) from Online to Offline: Japan’s Media Manipulation and Cultural Transcoding of Collective Memories”, The Journal of Contemporary Eastern...

Job: Assistant/Associate Professor, Surveillance Studies, Queen's University

The Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University invites applications for a Tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor with a specialization in Surveillance Studies with a preferred starting date of July 1, 2020. In the case of an exceptional candidate, a tenured appointment at the rank of Associate Professor would...

Lisa Carver

Professor Lisa Carver
Professor Lisa Carver

Assistant Professor, School of Kinesiology & Health Studies, Queen's University, Canada

I have a PhD in Sociology and MA in Psychology.  My training and research are focused in the areas of Health (particularly the social justice, equity and health and illness) Aging and Gender.  I am also interested in the human-animal bond and well-being. At a personal level, and in my primary research, I believe that we need to take a stand when we see the need for change.  As a result, my research follows my interests and concerns, exploring dynamics of power, inequalities and social justice in understanding the impacts of illness, gender, education, ethnicity and socioeconomic level on various stages of the lifecourse.

Telephone: 
613-533-6000 x75434

Lisa Kerr

Professor Lisa Kerr
Professor Lisa Kerr

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada

Lisa Kerr is an Assistant Professor at Queen’s Law where she teaches courses on criminal law, sentencing and prison law.

Professor Kerr earned her JD at the University of British Columbia. She clerked with the BC Court of Appeal and was an associate at Fasken Martineau. She also served as staff lawyer at Prisoners’ Legal Services, Canada’s only dedicated legal aid office for prisoners.

Lisa obtained an LLM and a JSD at New York University, where she was named a Trudeau Scholar.  Her research focuses on punishment theory, the comparative study of criminal law and prisoner rights, and the relationship between sentencing and prison conditions. Professor Kerr has published a number of papers and opinion pieces in law journals and newspapers on these topics.

Professor Kerr is preoccupied with the concept of litigation as an instrument of social change, and she engages extensively in pro bono litigation work. For several years, she has worked with Pivot Legal Society on a campaign to decriminalize sex work.  She has worked on multiple cases with the B.C. Civil Liberties Association and with the John Howard Society of Canada in efforts to abolish solitary confinement in Canadian prisons. 

 

Sachil Singh

Dr. Sachil Singh
Dr. Sachil Singh

Post-doctoral Fellow, Surveillance Studies Centre, Assistant Professor, Queen's University, Canada

Dr. Singh is a post-doctoral fellow at the SSC. He is collating research findings from all three streams of the SSHRC-funded Big Data Surveillance (BDS) research project, led by Professor David Lyon, and will play a major role in organizing a final research conference, to take place in 2021. He is also an Assistant Professor (Adjunct) in the Department of Sociology at Queen's University, where he teaches the department's largest course, Introduction to Sociology (SOCY122). Finally, Dr. Singh is a Privacy and Ethics Officer with the Centre for Advanced Computing at Queen's University where he offers critical contributions to the development of the Ontario Health Data Platform (formerly PANTHR). This is a multi-million dollar project that the Province has invested in as one of the key responses to COVID-19. 

Dr. Singh's main areas of study are medical sociology, critical race studies and surveillance. More specifically, his research interests are in algorithmic inequality, social sorting, health and surveillance, and race and ethnicity. The common thread in his work is attention to the racial outcomes of digital sorting technologies. His most recent article (co-authored with Val Steeves) in Social Science and Medicine deals with the contested meanings of race/ethnicity in medical literature. He has also published in leading journals such as Security Dialogue, contributed to Transparent Lives: Surveillance in Canada, and has co-edited a Special Issue in Surveillance & Society. He recently wrote an article in The Conversation which highlights concerns with racial surveillance as a way to understand the reach of the coronavirus pandemic.
 

Telephone: 
613-533-6000 ext. 74876

Scott Thompson

Professor Scott Thompson
Professor Scott Thompson

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Dr. Scott Thompson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Saskatchewan. Having been called ‘the genuine historian of Surveillance Studies,’ Scott uses historical case studies in order to explain and address current and pressing issues in the areas of Criminology, Sociology and Surveillance Studies. His publications include work on surveillance and the control and criminalization of liquor consumption (www.puncheddrunk.ca), surveillance and colonial/First Nations relationships, National Registration and Identity Cards in Canada and the United Kingdom, Big Data national security initiatives and partnerships, the adoption of Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV/UAS) by government and industry in Canada, and the taking up of ‘new’ surveillance technologies by police services. He took up his current position at the University of Saskatchewan in 2017, having completed a SSHRC Banting post-doctoral fellowship at the Surveillance Studies Center (Queen’s University, Department of Sociology), and his doctoral degree at the University of Alberta in Sociology.

In collaboration with other researchers in the Surveillance Studies Centre, his research has also included the adoption of UAV by police services, and the taking up of big data analytics by national security agencies.

Telephone: 
(306) 966-5236

Norma Möllers

Professor Norma Möllers
Professor Norma Möllers

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen's University, Canada

Broadly speaking, Norma Möllers’ research interests are located at the intersections of science, technology, and politics: What kinds of values shape science & technology, and how are science & technology implicated in maintaining social order? She is specifically interested in the science and technology of security and surveillance. Further research interests include cybersecurity, digital work/labor (with particular focus on its gendered and global dimensions), and ‘neoliberal’ technoscience.

Currently, she is working on her first book manuscript. Based on an ethnography of the development of a ‘smart’ video surveillance system, it deals with the ways in which science and technology become enrolled in national strategies concerning security, and how this connects to broader shifts in technoscientific knowledge production. She has also started work on her second project which will address the question how governments deal with problems of national territory in cyberspace.

Norma Möllers joined Queen’s Sociology department in Fall 2015. Prior to coming to Queen’s, she worked as a researcher at Humboldt-University’s science studies department in Berlin, as a visiting researcher at UC Irvine, and worked as a researcher at Potsdam University, Germany, which is also where she obtained her PhD. She has studied at Passau University, Germany, and at Sapienza University, Rome.