Collaborators

COLLABORATORS

Kiyoshi Abe
Yasmeen M. Abu-Laban
Sharryn J. Aiken
Louise Amoore
Mark Andrejevic
Nelson Arteaga Botello
Didier Bigo
Jean-Paul Brodeur (1943- 2010)
Nadia Caidi
Ayse Ceyhan
Aaron Doyle
Katja Franko Aas
Stephen D.N. Graham
Stephanie Hayman
Stéphane Leman-Langlois
Torin Monahan
Ben Muller
David Murakami Wood
Helen Nissenbaum
Clive Norris
David J. Phillips
Charles Raab
Priscilla M. Regan
Mark B. Salter
Gavin J.D. Smith
Valerie Steeves
Irma van der Ploeg
Eyal Weisman
Dean Wilson

 

 

Kiyoshi Abe

 

School of Sociology and Social Work, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan

Kyoshi Abe graduated from the School of Sociology at Kwansei Gakuin University in 1987. He finished doctoral courses in Sociology at the University of Tokyo in 1992. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo in 1995, he worked at the School of Informatics at Kansai University for five years. Since April 2000, he has been at the School of Sociology at Kwansei Gakuin University. His research themes are critical theories of information society, relationships between public spheres, media and communication, and cultural studies of media and nationalism. Some of his publications are, Public Sphere and Communication (1998), Communication in everyday life (2000), Wondering Nationalism (2001), and Sociology in Dialogue (2002).

Faculty website: http://www.kwansei.ac.jp/Contents_3811_0_13_0_0.html

 

Yasmeen M. Abu-Laban

 

Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Alberta, Canada

Dr. Abu-Laban received her Ph.D. from Carleton University in 1996. She was a Visiting Scholar (2004-2005) at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, and a McCalla Research Professor (2006-2007) at the University of Alberta. Dr. Abu-Laban’s research interests centre on the Canadian and comparative dimensions of gender and ethnic politics, nationalism, globalization and processes of racialization, immigration policies and politics, and citizenship theory. She has published over forty articles, book chapters and reviews including in such journals as Urban Affairs Review, International Politics, Citizenship Studies, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, The International Journal of Canadian Studies, Canadian Public Policy, and Canadian Ethnic Studies. She is the co-author (with Christina Gabriel) of Selling Diversity: Immigration, Multiculturalism, Employment Equity and Globalization (2002), co-editor of Politics in North America: Redefining Continental Relations (2008) and editor of Gendering the Nation-State: Canadian and Comparative Perspectives (2008). She is an Editorial Board Member of Canadian Ethnic Studies/Études ethniques au Canada, a member of the academic committee for University of Alberta Press, and serves as an elected member on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Political Science Association.


Faculty website: http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/polisci/nav03.cfm?nav03=13085&nav02=13021&nav01=12999

 

Sharryn J. Aiken

 

Faculty of Law, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario.

Sharry Aiken is an assistant professor in the faculty of law at Queen's University. She is the editor in chief of Refuge, Canada's Periodical on Refugees and is a past president of the Canadian Council for Refugees. In 2006 she represented a coalition of public interest groups, including the Canadian Council for Refugees and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, in an intervention before the Supreme Court of Canada in the cases of Charkaoui, Harkat and Almrei. Relevant publications include “Manufacturing ‘Terrorists’: Refugees, National Security and Canadian Law” (2000); “Of Gods and Monsters: National Security and Canadian Refugee Policy”, (2001); “Risking Rights: An Assessment of Canadian Border Security Policies” (2007); “From Slavery to Expulsion: Racism, Canadian Immigration Law and the Unfulfilled Promise of Modern Constitutionalism” (2007); and “National Security and Canadian Immigration: Deconstructing the Discourse of Trade-Offs” (forthcoming 2008). In 2007 she was awarded a SSHRC standard research grant for her project, Refugee Diasporas,“Homeland” Conflicts and the Impact of the Post-9/11 Security Paradigm.


Faculty website: http://law.queensu.ca/facultyAndStaff/facultyProfiles/aiken.html

 

Louise Amoore

 

Department of Geography, Durham University, United Kingdom

Louise Amoore’s research focuses on three key areas: global geopolitics and the governance of worker and migrant bodies; the politics and practices of risk management (with specific reference to the rise of risk consulting as a technology of governing); and political and social theories of resistance and dissent. Her current research project addresses the practices of consulting and risk management in relation to the ‘war on terror’, with a close focus on the proliferation of new border management techniques. Before arriving in Durham in 2005 Louise was a lecturer in International Politics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. She is co-editor of the Routledge/RIPE series in Global Political Economy.


Faculty website: http://www.dur.ac.uk/geography/staff/geogstaffhidden/?mode=staff&id=2710

 

Mark Andrejevic

 

Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies, University of Queensland, Australia

Mark Andrejevic is the ARC QEII Postdoctoral Fellow the Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies. His current project Interrogating Interactivity: New Media and Surveillance explores the ways in which interactive media technologies are used for commercial and government surveillance by drawing on several case studies, including interactive marketing campaigns, political campaign databases, homeland security initiatives, and interactive television. 

Mark Andrejevic completed his PhD. in Media Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He has since taught at Fairfield University and the University of Iowa, in the Department of Communication Studies. He is also the author of a book on reality TV Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched (Rowman & Littlefield: 2004) and iSpy: Surveillance and Power in the Interactive Era (University of Kansas Press: 2007).


Faculty website: http://cccs.uq.edu.au/?page=60348&pid=61040

 

Nelson Arteaga Botello

 

Faculdad de Ciencias Políticas, Universtad Autónoma del Estado de Mexico, Mexico

Nelson Arteaga Botello received his PhD at the University of Alicante, Spain. He is a member of the SNI (National System of Investigators in México). His main research interests are problematization fields and “dispositifs” through violence, public security and poverty. He has recently published Violencia y populismo punitivo en México, Globalización y violencia and Pobres y Delincuentes: estudio de sociología y genealogía.


Faculty website:

 

Didier Bigo

 

Institut d’Études Politiques Paris, Institut d’études politiques de Paris, France

Didier Bigo is professor of international relations at Sciences-Po, the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris since ten years and researcher at CERI/FNSP. He is also the director of the Center for study of conflict and the editor of the quarterly journal Cultures & Conflits published by L'Harmattan.


Faculty website: http://ecoledoctorale.sciences-po.fr/CV_enseignants/bigo.htm

 

Jean-Paul Brodeur (1943 - 2010)

École de Criminologie, Université de Montréal, Canada

Jean-Paul Brodeur was the director of the Centre international de criminologie comparée/ International Centre for Comparative Criminologie at the Université de Montréal. He was a past president of the Canadian Association for the Study of Intelligence and Security (CASIS). He was awarded a Killam scholarship (2003/2004) and was a member of the Royal Society of Canada since 1989. He published books and articles on policing, sentencing and politically motivated deviance. He was also research director for several commissions of inquiry (federal and Québec provincial). His most recent books are Democracy, Law and Security (2003, with Peter Gill and Dennis Töllborg) and Citoyens et Délateurs (with Fabien Jobard). Jean-Paul Brodeur passed away on 26 April 2010.


Nadia Caidi

Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto, Canada

Nadia Caidi is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto. Her primary research interests are information policy and social/community informatics. She is also involved in cross-cultural and comparative studies, researching the influence of culture on the production, distribution and use of information and its technologies. Nadia's research on information control and the public's right to know in times of crisis has been awarded two three-year grants (2004-2007, 2007-2010) from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) in Canada. She is currently completing a book on this topic (to be published by Blackwell Publishing). A forthcoming article on “Information Practices of Canadian Muslims Post 9/11” will appear in Government Information Quarterly (2008).

Faculty website: http://www3.fis.utoronto.ca/faculty/caidi/home.html

 

Ayse Ceyhan

 

Political Science, Sciences PO, France

Dr Ayse Ceyhan is a political scientist. She teaches at Sciences Po Paris and is specialized in issues of security, technology and identity. She leads a research group at la Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (MSH) Paris on security technologies. She organized a cross-disciplinary conference on biometrics in January 2008 examining the economic, technological, political, sociological, ethical and juridical aspects of this technology.
Among her most representative publications: “Technologization of Security: Management of Uncertainty and Risk in the Age of Biometrics”, Surveillance & Society. No 5(2), 2008; “Technologie et sécurité: une gouvernance libérale dans un contexte d’incertitudes”, Cultures et Conflits, no. 64, 2006; “Identification et surveillance à l’heure de la biométrie”, Cultures et Conflits, no. 64, 2006; “Policing by Dossiers: Identification and Surveillance in an Era of Uncertainty and Fear”, in D.Bigo, E.Guild (eds.), Controlling Borders, London, Ashgate, 2005; “La Biométrie une technologie pour gérer les incertitudes de la modernité contemporaine”, Cahiers de l’INHES, Printemps 2005, no.56.

 

Aaron Doyle

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton University, Canada

Faculty page: http://www5.carleton.ca/socanth/people/doyle-aaron


 

 

Katja Franko Aas

 

Institute of Criminology and Sociology of Law, University of Oslo, Norway

Katja Franko Aas is Associate Professor at the Institute of Criminology and Sociology of Law, University of Oslo. She has written extensively on the use of information and communication technologies in criminal justice systems including Sentencing in the Age of Information: from Faust to Macintosh (Glasshouse Press, 2005, shared winner of the 2006 Hart SLSA book prize) and Globalization and Crime (SAGE Publications, 2007). Her most recent book is Technologies of Insecurity: the surveillance of everyday life (Routledge, 2008), co-edited with H.M. Lomell and H. O. Gundhus.

Faculty website: http://www.jus.uio.no/prosjekter/cctc/aas.html

 

Stephen D.N. Graham

 

Department of Geography, Durham University, United Kingdom

Stephen Graham is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Durham and Deputy Director of the Centre for the Study of Cities and Regions (http://www.dur.ac.uk/cscr/) He is also Associate Director of the International Boundaries Research Unit (http://www.dur.ac.uk/ibru/). Over the last fifteen years Professor Graham's research has sought to understand the relations between urban places and mobility, infrastructure and technology on the one hand, and war, surveillance and geopolitics on the other. In particular, his recent work has explored the ‘splintering’ of urban spaces and infrastructures, mobilities and cities; the implications of new media technologies for urban life; and the proliferation of urban surveillance systems which are increasingly automated through computer software. Emerging work is addressing the connections between cities and critical geopolitics. Themes here include: how global urbanisation is affecting military doctrine; how the ‘war on terror’ impacts on cities; the ways in which infrastructures are targeted by political violence; and how the 'surge' of surveillance since 9/11 is impacting on urban life.

Faculty website: http://www.dur.ac.uk/geography/research/researchclusters/?mode=staff&id=934

 

Stephanie Hayman

 

Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Canada

Stephanie Hayman has conducted research (with Tim Newburn) into the impact upon police detainees of 24-hour CCTV in-cell surveillance. Her other research has primarily been in the area of women’s imprisonment, particularly the development of the new federal prisons for women in Canada. Stephanie is on the Advisory Board of Criminal Justice Matters, a journal published jointly by the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, King’s College, London and Routledge. Her publications include: (with Tim Newburn) Policing, Surveillance and Social Control (2002), Willan; and Imprisoning Our Sisters: The New Federal Women’s Prisons in Canada (2006), McGill-Queens’ University Press.

Faculty website: http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/sociology/nav03.cfm?nav03=67599&nav02=26201&nav01=26128

Stéphane Leman-Langlois

School of Social Work, Laval University, Quebec

Stéphane Leman-Langlois is professor of criminology at the School of Social Work, Laval University (Quebec City). He holds the Canada Research Chair in Surveillance and the Social Construction of Risk and is Research Director of the Terrorism and Counterterrorism Research Group at the International Centre for Comparative Criminology (University of Montreal). His research has focussed on policing, criminal and security intelligence, terrorism and the new technologies of social control. His latest books include: (with Jean-Paul Brodeur, 2009) Terrorisme et Antiterrorisme au Canada, Montreal, Presses de l’Université de Montréal; (2008)  Technocrime: Technology, Crime and Social Control, London, Willan; (2007) La Sociocriminologie, Montréal, Presses de l’Université de Montréal.

Websites:
http://www.crime-reg.com
http://www.crimereg.wordpress.com
http://www.social-surveillance.com

 

Torin Monahan

 

Associate Professor of Human & Organizational Development and Associate Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, United States

Torin Monahan is trained in science and technology studies (STS), which is an interdisciplinary, social science field devoted to studying the societal implications of and design processes behind technological systems and scientific knowledge. He has received three NSF grants for research and workshops on surveillance technologies and has published widely on issues of surveillance and security, including one edited book, Surveillance and Security: Technological Politics and Power in Everyday Life (Routledge, 2006), five peer-reviewed journal articles, and three book chapters to date. He is a member of the international Surveillance Studies Network and is on the editorial board for the primary academic journal in the field, Surveillance & Society. Additionally, he has taught an undergraduate course on “surveillance and society” every year for the past three years at Arizona State University. More information to be found at www.torinmonahan.com.

Faculty website: http://www.torinmonahan.com/

 

Ben Muller

King's University College, Western University, Canada

Faculty website: http://www.kings.uwo.ca/academics/kings-faculty/faculty-biographies/benjamin-muller/

 

 

David Murakami Wood

 

Department of Sociology, Queen's University

Educated at Oxford and Newcastle, UK, David Murakami Wood is a Canada Research Chair (Tier II) and Associate Professor of Surveillance Studies in the Department of Sociology. He specialises in the study of the history, technologies, practices and ethics of surveillance. He is also interested in: ubiquitous computing; urban resilience to disaster, war and terrorism; and in international cross-cultural comparative studies of these and other urban developments, particularly in the UK, Japan and Brazil. In 2006, he was an Exchange Visiting Fellow at Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, and in 2009 he was a Visiting Professor at the Catholic University of Parana and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil. He is a co-founder and Managing Editor of the international journal of surveillance studies, Surveillance & Society, and a co-founder and trustee of the Surveillance Studies Network (SSN), the new charitable global association for surveillance studies. He co-ordinated and edited the aclaimed Report on the Surveillance Society, for the Office of the Information Commissioner, in the UK, published in November 2006. He has been published in a wide range of academic journals including Urban Studies, International Relations and Society & Space, a new book, The Everyday Resilience of the City is out now, and he is currently working on two books on globalization and surveillance, and on new space and scale of surveillance. He is currently working on projects on implants and cultures of urban surveillance.

Faculty website: http://ubisurv.wordpress.com/

 

Helen Nissenbaum

 

Media, Culture and Communication, New York University, United States

Helen Nissenbaum is a Professor of Media, Culture and Communication and of Computer Science at New York University, where she is also a Faculty Fellow
of the Information Law Institute. Her areas of expertise include social, ethical, and political implications of computing and information technology. Grants from the National Science Foundation, Ford Foundation, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security have supported research projects on privacy, trust online, security, intellectual property, and several projects investigating political values in computer and information systems, including search engines, video games, and facial recognition systems. She has produced three books, Emotion and Focus, Computers, Ethics and Social Values (co-edited with D.J. Johnson), and Academy and the Internet (co-edited with Monroe Prince), and over 40 research articles, published in scholarly journals of philosophy, political philosophy, law, media studies, information studies, and computer science. Before joining the faculty at NYU, Nissenbaum was Member at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, served as Associate Director of Princeton University’s Center for Human Values and held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for the Study of Language and Information at Stanford. She holds a B.A. with honors from the University of Witwatersand, Johannesburg, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford University.

Faculty website: http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/mcc/faculty_bios/view/Helen_Nissenbaum

 

Clive Norris

 

Department of Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom


Faculty website: http://www.shef.ac.uk/socstudies/staff/staff-profiles/norris.html

 

David J. Phillips

 

Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto, Canada
David Phillips is Associate Professor of Information Studies at the University of Toronto. He studies the political economy and social shaping of information and communication technologies, especially technologies of privacy, identification, and surveillance. He is the author of “From Privacy to Visibility: Context, Identity, and Power in Ubiquitous Computing Environments” (in Social Text), “Texas 9-1-1: Emergency Telecommunications and the Genesis of Surveillance Infrastructure” (in Telecommunication Policy), “Queering Surveillance Research” (in Queer Online: Media Technology and Sexuality) and “Negotiating the Digital Closet: Online Pseudonymity and the Politics of Sexual Identity” (in Information, Communication, and Society), and numerous other works exploring the relations among information, economics, ideology, policy, culture, identity, and technology.

Faculty website:http://www.ischool.utoronto.ca/users/davidjphillips

 

Charles Raab

 

School of Social and Political Studies, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Charles D. Raab is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Fellow in the School of Social and Political Studies at The University of Edinburgh. He is the Specialist Adviser to the House of Lords Select Committee on the Constitution’s current inquiry into the Impact of Surveillance and Data Collection upon the Privacy of Citizens and their Relationship with the State. His main research interests are in public policy and governance, including British government, information policy (privacy protection and public access to information) and information technology in democratic politics, government and commerce. His research has been funded by the ESRC, the National Science Foundation (USA), the European Commission, the Nuffield Foundation, the Scottish Office and the Scottish Executive. Publications include (with C Bennett) The Governance of Privacy: Policy Instruments in Global Perspective (Ashgate, 2003; 2nd edition MIT Press, 2006); (with M Arnott, eds.), The Governance of Schooling: Comparative Studies (Routledge/Falmer, 2000); (with M Anderson et al.), Policing the European Union (Clarendon Press, 1996); (with A McPherson), Governing Education: A Sociology of Policy Since 1945(Edinburgh U.P., 1988) and many contributions to academic journals and edited volumes. He is a member of the editorial boards of tenjournals in the fields of information policy and public policy.

Faculty website: http://www.pol.ed.ac.uk/staff_profiles/raab_charles

 

Priscilla M. Regan

 

Public and International Affairs, George Mason University, United States

Pris Regan is a Professor in the Department of Public and International Affairs at George Mason University. Prior to joining that faculty in 1989, she was a Senior Analyst in the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (1984-1989) and an Assistant Professor of Politics and Government at the University of Puget Sound (1979-1984). Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Regan's primary research interest has been the analysis of the social, policy, and legal implications of organizational use of new information and communications technologies. Dr. Regan has published over twenty articles or book chapters, as well as Legislating Privacy: Technology, Social Values, and Public Policy (University of North Carolina Press, 1995). As a recognized researcher in this area, Dr. Regan has testified before Congress and participated in meetings held by the Department of Commerce, Federal Trade Commission, Social Security Administration, and Census Bureau. Dr. Regan received her PhD in Government from Cornell University in 1981 and her BA from Mount Holyoke College in 1972.

Faculty website: http://pia.gmu.edu/people/details/pregan

 

Mark B. Salter

 

School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa, Canada

Since receiving his doctorate from the University of British Columbia in 1999, Mark B. Salter taught for three years at the American University in Cairo before taking his current position. In 2008, he will be a Visiting Scholar at the Centre of International Studies and a Visiting Fellow of the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities at the University of Cambridge. Salter is editor of Politics at the Airport (2008) and co-editor with Elia Zureik of Global Policing and Surveillance: borders, security identity (2005) – both of which stemmed from workshops held under the aegis of the Surveillance Project. He is author of Rights of Passage: the passport in international relations (2003), Barbarians and Civilization in International Relations (2002) (also published in Chinese) and articles in: International Political Sociology, Alternatives, Security Dialogue, International Studies Perspectives, the Journal of Air Transport Management, and the Journal of Transportation Security. Last year, he was the recipient of a National Capital Educator’s Award and the 2006-2007 Excellence in Education Prize at the University of Ottawa.

Faculty website: http://www.socialsciences.uottawa.ca/pol/eng/profdetails.asp?id=127

 

Gavin J.D. Smith

Department of Sociology, Australian National University, Australia

Gavin J.D. Smith is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the Australian National University. He was previously a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Social Policy at The University of Sydney and, before that, a Lecturer in Sociology and Criminology at City University London, UK. Educated at the University of Aberdeen, UK, Gavin's main research interests include the mid-range interactivity between systems and subjects of surveillance, with particular focus on the meanings both actors place upon surveillance encounters/exchanges and resultant social dynamics. He is currently working on projects examining the relationship between political economy and surveillance normalisation, the application of surveillance apparatuses into diverse cultral fields (at local and global levels) and the role of the scientific imagination in the creation, design, manufacture and legitimation of surveillance devices. Gavin established and coordinated for two years the world's first MA Surveillance Studies degree programme at City University London and was also responsible for the recent organisation of a gloabl conference on surveillance culture in London funded by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST). He is currently writing a monograph - Opening the Black Box: The Everyday Life of Surveillance (Routledge, 2011) - based on his doctoral research on the cultural practices and subjectivities of surveillance workers, and is co-author (with Martin French) on a general surveillance text, Key Concepts in Surveillance Cultures (Sage, 2012).

Faculty website: https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/smith-gjd

 

Valerie Steeves

 

Department of Criminology, University of Ottawa, Canada

Valerie Steeves is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa. Her main area of research is the impact of new technologies on human rights issues. Professor Steeves has spoken and written extensively on privacy, and was the lead researcher for the Young Canadians in a Wired World research project, measuring the effect of new media on young people’s privacy and social relationships. Ms. Steeves has appeared as an expert witness before a number of Parliamentary Committees regarding privacy legislation, and is a member of the Canadian Standards Association’s Technical Committee on Privacy. She has also worked with a number of government departments to develop privacy education curriculum and materials. Her Web-based educational game Sense and NonSense won the first annual Excellence in Race Relations Education award from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation in 1998 and her game Privacy Playground was awarded the Bronze Medal at the 2006 Summit Creative Awards Competition, an international competition involving thousands of entries from 26 countries. In 2004, Professor Steeves was awarded the LaBelle Lectureship from McMaster University. The LaBelle is a juried prize that recognizes scholars doing interdisciplinary work and challenging accepted ideas.

Faculty website: http://www.socialsciences.uottawa.ca/crm/eng/profDetails.asp?id=36

 

Irma van der Ploeg

 

Infonomics & New Media Research Center, Zuyd University, the Netherlands

Irma van der Ploeg holds degrees from the universities of Groningen and Maastricht in philosophy and science and technology studies; as Associate Professor she is heading the Infonomics & New Media Research Centre at Zuyd University, Maastricht/Heerlen, The Netherlands. She has published extensively on philosophical, normative, and gender aspects of medical reproductive technologies and information technologies, specifically biometric identification technologies, and has been involved as principal investigator in various projects for the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), as well as for various government departments and advice councils. She is author of “The Machine-Readable Body. Essays on Biometrics and the Informatization of the Body (Maastricht: Shaker, 2005). For Erasmus University MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, she participated in the EC/FP6 project ‘Biometric Identification Technologies and Ethics (BITE), and is currently involved in several EC/FP7 projects (a.o. HIDE (Homeland Security, Biometric Identification & Personal Detection Ethics, ACTIBIO (Unobtrusive Authentication Using Activity Related and Soft Biometrics). Her ERC-Starters Grant application ‘DigIDeas’ (Social and Ethical Aspects of Digital Identities) was recommended for funding (final decision expected in June ’08) .

Faculty website:

 

Eyal Weisman

 

Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths College, University of London, United Kingdom

Eyal Weizman is an Architect based in London. He studied architecture at the Architectural Association in London and completed his PhD at the London Consortium, Birkbeck College. He is the director of the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Before this role, Weizman was Professor of Architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Weizman has taught, lectured, curated and organised conferences in many institutions worldwide. His books include Hollow Land [Verso Books, 2007], A Civilian Occupation [Verso Books, 2003], the series Territories 1,2 and 3, Yellow Rhythms and many articles in journals, magazines and edited books. Weizman is a regular contributors to many journals and magazines and is an editor at large for Cabinet Magazine (New York). Weizman is the recipient of the James Stirling Memorial Lecture Prize for 2006-2007

Faculty website: http://www.goldsmiths.ac.uk/architecture/staff.php

 

Dean Wilson

Plymouth Law School, University of Plymouth

Dean Wilson is an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in Criminology at the Plymouth Law School, University of Plymouth. His research interests include the impact of biometrics on border control, police interactions with victims of crime, and the role of surveillance in the structuring of security. He has published widely on policing, CCTV in Australian public spaces and biometrics. He is the Oceania editor for the online journal Surveillance & Society and the editor (with Clive Norris) of Surveillance, Crime and Social Control (2006).

Faculty website:http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/dwilson2

 

 

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