SSC Seminar Series

SSC Seminar Series: Martin French, Concordia University

Player (Self) Tracking: Responsible Gaming in the Digital Era

Martin French, Concordia University

Wednesday, November 30 

12:30 - 2:00pm, MacCorry Room D411 (Sociology Lounge)

This presentation outlines a new project, situated at the intersection of risk studies, surveillance studies, game studies and gambling studies. Responsible gaming can be conceptualized as a late-modern governance strategy designed to regulate harms associated with institutionalization of gambling. It...

SSC Seminar Series: Jennifer R. Whitson, University of Waterloo

Drawing from a two-year ethnographic study of game developers in Montreal, Canada, this talk illustrates the human aspect of informational practice, providing a description of what of big data practice looks like in the trenches of digital media production.

CANCELLED - SSC Seminar Series: Sami Coll, visiting scholar, Université du Québec à Montréal

The Order of Big Data: Towards a Digital Episteme 

Sami Coll 

Tuesday October 11th • 12:30pm - 2:00pm • Mackintosh Corry Hall D411  CANCELLED

In The Order of Things (1966) Michel Foucault historicises how knowledge is produced from the pre-classical to the modern age. Can the way big data aims at producing knowledge in the 21st century be considered a new...

SSC Seminar Series: Colin Bennett, University of Victoria

Is Your Neighbour a Liberal or a Conservative? Voter Surveillance and the ‘Data-Driven’ Election Campaign

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

12:30 – 2 pm

Stirling Hall 401

(Grad Students are also invited to join Colin Bennett for an informal discussion in MacCorry room C512 from 10.30 to 11.30 before his seminar.)

The conventional wisdom is that the modern political campaign needs to be “data driven” to consolidate...

SSC Seminar Series: Adam Molnar, Deakin University, Australia

Computer Network Operations and ‘Rule-with-Law’ in Australia and Canada
. Location: MacCorry Hall, Room D411 (Sociology Lounge). Computer Network Operations (CNOs) refer to government intrusion and/or interference with information communication infrastructures for the purposes of law enforcement and security intelligence. This presentation argues that while the domestic application of CNOs may be ‘lawful’ in Canada and Australia, their use is subject to ‘counter-law’ developments that undermine rule-of-law and threaten democratic freedoms.

SSC Seminar Series: Elia Zureik, Queen's University

Elia Zureik, Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, Queen's University

"Big Data in the Gulf Cooperation Council Countries"

Location: Ellis Hall Room 226

12:30-2:00pm

Elia Zureik's interest in the state of Qatar and big data is related to his work on surveillance, the Third World and colonialism. Qatar has the highest per capita income approximating $100,000 annually, and is a heavy user of information technology....

SSC Seminar Series: Research Round-Up

The aim of this meeting is to give everyone the opportunity to welcome new and returning students, staff and faculty and update each other on recent and ongoing research as it relates to surveillance studies. Please come prepared to discuss your current work. Pizza provided!

Kindly R.S.V.P. to Joan Sharpe (surveill @ queensu.ca) by Tuesday, September 13, 2016. 

Location: MacCorry D411 (Sociology...

SSC Seminar Series: Ann Cavoukian

Location: Mac Corry Hall, Room D411

12:30- 2:00 pm

SSC Seminar Series: Val Steeves

Location: Mac Corry Hall, Room D411D216

12:30- 2:00 pm

Prying Open the Black Box: What Hello Barbie Can Tell Us About Behavioural Advertising

This talk unpacks the development of Barbie from toy to website to robot, and analyzes the privacy implications of embedding corporate data collection into a child’s imagination through real-time conversations with artificial intelligence software.

Everyone welcome!

SSC Seminar Series: Alana Saulnier

Location: Mac Corry Hall, Room D411
12:30- 2:00 pm

The surveilled subject’s experience: Looking for consistencies

Surveillance studies has been somewhat inattentive to the perspective of the surveilled subject. It is the functioning of the surveillance apparatus, not the relatively inconsequential subject, which has tended to frame the focus of surveillance inquiries; leaving understandings of surveilled subjects’ experiences relatively limited. This research...

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