Krystle Maki

Department of Sociology, Queen’s University

Krystle Maki's research interests involve understanding the connections between neoliberal welfare state restructuring and the increased surveillance of those living on social assistance. Specifically, she is interested in investigating the classed, gendered and racialized consequences of welfare surveillance administered by Ontario Works (welfare). More broadly, her research draws from a number of theoretical and methodological frameworks informed by: Welfare studies, Socialist Feminist theory, Social Movements, Participatory Action Based Research, Welfare Surveillance, Anti-Racist Feminism, Social Control, and personal experience with social movement activism.

Krystle's dissertation will explore the uncharted relationship between Ontario Works (OW) and surveillance and its affects on recipients, service providers and community advocacy groups. This project builds upon her Master’s thesis, ‘Guilty Until Proven Eligible: Welfare Surveillance of Single Mothers in Ontario’ (2009), in which her research analyzed eight surveillance practices administered by OW uncovered in welfare legislation, regulations, acts and policies.